The Trail Went Cold – Episode 80 – Eric Tamiyasu

June 25, 2001. Hood River, Oregon. During a date with a friend, 41-year old Eric Tamiyasu hears strange noises outside his home and discovers an unidentified shoeprint. After his friend leaves for the night, Eric is not heard from for five days. His decomposing body is eventually discovered in his bed and it turns out he has been shot three times in the head. The investigation would uncover a number of intriguing suspects: the local sheriff, who made the odd decision to destroy a crucial piece of evidence; a close friend and business partner who allegedly had a dispute with Eric over money; and the person who discovered Eric’s body and displayed some very strange behavior. Did any these of suspects murder Eric Tamiyasu, or was someone else responsible? We explore a true whodunit on this week’s edition of “The Trail Went Cold”.

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“The Trail Went Cold” will be appearing alongside other true crime podcasts at a “A Canadian Crime Podcast Event” on July 22 at The Hideout in Toronto. For more information on the event and to purchase tickets for only $10, please visit here.

We would like to thank our sponsor, Winc, for supporting this week’s episode. To receive a $20 credit and free shipping on 4 bottles of wine on your first order, go to trywinc.com/cold.

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The Trail Went Cold is produced and edited by Magill Foote.

All music is composed by Vince Nitro.

One thought on “The Trail Went Cold – Episode 80 – Eric Tamiyasu

  • If I caught that correctly, this “Sam Spade” character referred to the Taco Bell incident occurring “the day before [Eric’s] death”. Assuming this is true, it would imply that the poster knew the exact day that Eric died, when even the authorities appear to have no such knowledge (due to uncertainty resulting from the state of decomposition). While the poster’s truthfulness in general is questionable, this embedded implication about their knowledge could be a Freudian slip.

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